Google Has Expanded Its Street View Coverage To Include Landmarks And Monuments

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Google has now added three more African countries to its Street View application. The announcement of additions was made via the company’s own blog on February 10. Happily, Street View was also optimized for mobile in August, as well as having the Daydream VR support added November. That means these new locations can be explored by users both from virtually anywhere and completely virtually.

Google has added some of the highlights from the majestic continent of Africa to its Google Street View knowledge base and starting today, you will be able to take virtual tours of “some of the most iconic landmarks and monuments in Ghana, Uganda, and Senegal.”

google street veiw

Street View application

You can now explore a total of 81 countries without ever leaving your home by way of Google Street View, seven of which are located in Africa. Among the new locales that Google seems most excited about are a UNESCO World Heritage site village called Nzulezo. The village sits a top stilts over Lake Tadane in Ghana and became a world heritage site in the year 2000. The company added Ghana’s National Theater, which is where the country’s national companies for dance, orchestra reside, and theater. Moving on to Senegal, it’s now possible to virtually visit the 160 foot tall African Rennaissance Monument. The bronze monument is located just outside of Dakar, which itself sits along the western coast of the country on the Atlantic Ocean. Aside from the city of Dakar, Google mentions the addition of several other large towns, landmarks, and main roads within Senegal. Lastly, the company added a total of seven national parks in Uganda. These are said to include a Queen Elizabeth National Park, which is likely the Uganda’s most popular park – with the Ministry of Tourism for the country having previously said that visits to the park make up as many as 42% of all park visits in the country. The park boasts a huge array of birds and 10 species of the primate. Many examples of those were likely digitally captured by Google’s Street View teams and Ugandan partners.